HED Jet 6 FR Wheel Review

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A few weeks ago I was introduced to a gentleman named Brent Dawson through one of my teammates. Back in the late 90's and early 2000's Brent was pro cyclist, Junior World Teams Pursuit Champion and Elite Australian Criterium champion. He's still a gun rider in his own right, but his main business now is importing HED wheels into Australia.

After chatting with Brent I hit the jackpot and came away with a set of HED Jet 6 FR (Flamme Rouge) wheels to try out. I’ve been riding these for a month now and since the ITT World Championship was just won by Tony Martin on similar wheels, I can’t think of a better time to talk about them.

A world championship time trial on clinchers you ask? That’s right, Tony Martin won his rainbow jersey using a HED Jet 9 FR front clincher and Jet Stallion FR disc on the rear (the ‘Stallion’ build means its a 28 spoke disc build, making it very stiff). I believe Judith Arndt won her World title using this same clincher rear disc.

Tony Martin on his way to becoming the 2011 World TT Champion on front and rear clinchers made by HED

Tony Martin also won the final time trial of the 2011 TdF in Grenoble on a HED Jet 6 clincher on the front and a HED Stinger Disc (tubular) on the rear:

Tony Martin in Grenoble winning the final TT of the 2011 TdF. Front Hed Jet 6 clincher (Continental tyre) and rear Hed Stinger Disc (23mm wide rim) with a 22mm Conti Podium tubular.

Enough with the endorsements. Sure it gives HED clinchers some clout, but Martin and Arndt probably could have won their titles on square wheels. I’m not certain of their sponsorship obligations, but since I’ve seen Martin ride both HED clinchers and tubulars, the fact that he chose to ride clincher wheels is something special in it’s own right.

There is a shifting belief that clinchers have less rolling resistance than tubulars. There is also a trend where wheel manufacturers are beginning to use wider rims. HED now uses 23mm instead of the usual 19mm. My Zipp Firecrests have a noticeably large rim width at 25.5mm.

Steve Hed told Velonews:

“With the right clincher on that Jet 6 rim, there’s probably nothing faster. Some tires are better than others aerodynamically on our rim, and Contis tend to be the best. Rolling resistance doesn’t vary with speed, and as the bikes and wheels have become more aerodynamic, rolling resistance has become a bigger percentage of overall drag. Using a wide clincher rim and reduced tire pressure, a clincher feels more like a tubular and can roll faster.”

I’ve been riding these wheels for a month now and absolutely love them. The look great, they handle beautifully, the hubs roll smoothly, and best of all, they sound like you’re cruising along in the Millenium Falcon. The first thing everyone comments about is how cool they sound.

What everyone wants to know though, are they fast? I always think that’s a tough thing to quantify in real world conditions, but there’s heaps of wind tunnel testing out there that says that they are. Comparing wind tunnel simulations is a whole other topic I won’t to get into here. It’s an interesting technical aspect that attempts to quantify a wheel’s value, but in the end it’s the rider who makes a set of wheels fast.

I own a set of Zipp Firecrests full carbon clinchers which makes an interesting comparison to these. The main difference is that the HED use an alloy breaking surface with a carbon flange, and the Zipps are completely carbon. The overall feel between the two wheelsets is remarkably similar. The biggest difference is weight, breaking power/predictability on the alloy v.s. carbon surface, and price. There are definitely merits to both and for most of us it comes down to what you’re willing to spend.

HED uses steel bearings in their hubs. Their reason for not using ceramic bearings is because they don't have contact seals and therefore wear out quicker. Contact seals are important in bearings because they keep the road grime out. Don't worry, even though there's hype around ceramic bearings, steel bearings won't slow you down!

The rear hub has a grease port underneath the removable carbon cap for easy maintenance access. The rear hub has 4 sets of bearings: 2 in the hub and 2 in the cassette body.

The carbon flange (or "cap" as HED calls it) is primarily for aerodynamics, it's not structural. It's built from a thin 1k carbon weave and if feels soft when pinching it with your fingers. This is bonded to a HED C2 alloy clincher rim

The HED Jet 6 Flamme Rouge wheelset. 18 bladed front spokes, 24 rear.

The Jet 6 Flamme Rouge wheels I’ve been using RRPs for $2250 AUD. You can also get the more basic Jet 6 wheelset for $1750 AUD. The differences are the usual suspects: weight, hub quality, spokes, and therefore price.

Jet 6 FR Specifications

• C2 Scandium clincher rims
• Light weight FR 1K carbon aero section
• 18 front and 24 rear silver bladed spokes
• Carbon FR Sonic hubs
• Rear hub grease port with carbon port cap
• Titanium Ratchet ring
• Titanium Skewer, Rim Tape and valve extender included
• Rider weight limit 190lbs
• Stallion build available for riders 191-225lbs
• Available in Power Tap or track model
• Weights (g): Front: 797 – Rear: 984
• Width: 23mm, Depth 60mm

The Jet 6 FR’s aren’t extremely light nor are they exceptionally stiff. Many people rank wheels on these metrics, but lighter and stiffer doesn’t necessarily mean that’s right for all circumstances. These wheels aren’t designed to be a pure climbing wheel. They were designed for road and crit racing, and of course the front one is a pretty good TT wheel.

In my opinion, the Jet 6 FR is not only a exceptional value for money, but an excellent race wheelset that I’d expect to pay in the $3k range. After a month of use I can’t think of anything negative to say about (except that I got a puncture on Tuesday). If they’re good enough for Der Panzerwagen, they’re good enough for me.

Follow HED on twitter or HEDcycling.com.au.


SIMILAR ENTRIES

Showing 5 entries
  • malocchio

    mow your lawn!

  • Dave Christenson

    I’ve got the HED Stinger 4 FR and really like them a lot…they’re pretty good all around…also, I saw the new HED 7 FR at interbike…those will be great for TT and flat courses

  • S Gardo

    ” “At the speeds Tony is going, yaw angles will always be less than 10 degrees, and within that range, the Jet 6 is just as fast as the Stinger 9, which is the fastest wheel there is.” ”
    Interesting comment there. Tony won with an average speed of 51.8km/h, at that speed a cross wind (at 90°) of 9km/h would create a yaw angle of 10°. Do they only race TT’s in winds <9km/h?

  • Supafly46

    Very nice wheels, pity I dont ride fast enough to feel any difference :(

  • Guest

    I dont care how light or fast they are becuase they are UGLY. Sorry.

  • Tim

    Good review.

    What from their range would you recommend for climbing/road racing (dead roads, hilly).

    An interest comment of note from your review is attributable to Steve Hed:”Using a wide clincher rim and reduced tire pressure, a clincher feels more like a tubular and can roll faster.”

    I’m not techy in the bike arena, so my curiosity is piqued. How is it that a flatter tyre can roll faster? Doesn’t the increased road contact increase the rolling resistance?

    I am on the hunt for some FAST new racing wheels to replace my beloved Reynolds DVT46 UL tubs (which I might buy another pair of by the way, they were shockingly light and fast).

    A good post CT might be a comparison: the ants pants in tubs (Reynolds V HEDs V Zipps V GZeros) and same in clinchers. Maybe pick 2 sweet spots: Crit/road, climbing/road.

    Be a big undertaking but I am sure the wheel companies would want to be on board for it.

  • Tim

    Good review.

    What from their range would you recommend for climbing/road racing (dead roads, hilly).

    An interest comment of note from your review is attributable to Steve Hed:”Using a wide clincher rim and reduced tire pressure, a clincher feels more like a tubular and can roll faster.”

    I’m not techy in the bike arena, so my curiosity is piqued. How is it that a flatter tyre can roll faster? Doesn’t the increased road contact increase the rolling resistance?

    I am on the hunt for some FAST new racing wheels to replace my beloved Reynolds DVT46 UL tubs (which I might buy another pair of by the way, they were shockingly light and fast).

    A good post CT might be a comparison: the ants pants in tubs (Reynolds V HEDs V Zipps V GZeros) and same in clinchers. Maybe pick 2 sweet spots: Crit/road, climbing/road.

    Be a big undertaking but I am sure the wheel companies would want to be on board for it.

  • http://facebook.com/brad.priest1 Priestie

    Great article/review as always. Nice wheels.

    Just wondering how does the heat dissipation go with the wheels? A TT is one thing, descending is another.

  • jules

    i’d like to see Der Panzerwagen win on a set of WH-R500s. that would be impressive.

  • jules

    i’d like to see Der Panzerwagen win on a set of WH-R500s. that would be impressive.

  • jules

    i’d like to see Der Panzerwagen win on a set of WH-R500s. that would be impressive.

  • http://www.cyclingTipsBlog.com cyclingTips

    From what I understand, HED haven’t done a full carbon clincher because they’re not convinced they’re better for braking and heat dissipation.  

    Aluminum is a good conductor of heat while carbon is a good insulator. If the resin gets hot enough from braking to soften, the tire pressure can push the carbon clincher rim walls out. Carbon tubulars also get hot from braking, but there is no pressure pushing on the rim walls from the tire. Zipp apparently worked for 2 years on a resin system that could withstand the heat.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=636550395 Robert Merkel

    Depends on what you want.  If you want CT’s subjective opinion on which are nicer to ride, that’s easy.  If you want to find out which ones will actually make you faster, that requires a lot more time and effort to give a rigorous answer than CT would presumably have time to provide.

    For that matter, the major cycling magazines don’t really do this kind of testing properly either.  One of the better efforts I’ve seen recently is Velo News’s attempt to compare aero road frames, but this type of testing is a) extremely rare, and b) still has some serious flaws.

    And then there’s the question on whether the science is missing something.  I can argue till I’m blue in the face that CT would be better off using the Jet 6 clinchers (or 404 clinchers) than a set of “climbing wheels” anywhere short of Baw Baw, that “rotating weight” makes essentially no difference, etc. etc. etc., but from past discussions on here he seems convinced that ultra-light climbing wheels are worthwhile, and he’s not Robinson Crusoe on this. 

    There’s two possibilities – one, he’s wrong, and the climbing wheels are the “magic feather” effect, or, two, that the science is missing something (for instance, that hilly races are decided on the very steepest part of the slopes, where aerodynamics is least important).

  • JBS

    Recently bought a set of the HED Ardennes SL’s; same alloy rim as the Jet’s without the carbon cap, and from the look of CT’s pictures, same hubs too.

    On the limited use they’ve had so far I can’t say that they roll any quicker than a standard clincher, but they certainly don’t roll any slower.  What the wider tyre does do is make them corner noticeably better than the standard.  I wouldn’t say that they feel exactly like tubulars, but they are definitely a big step in that direction.  So far so good in my opinion.

    The hubs roll nice too.

    Just my 2 cents.

  • jimmyk

    you are right, to a degreee (partial pun right there).
    But while tony had an average speed of 51.8 he would have spent a lot of time going considerably faster than that which would have helped. Also he may have had a selection of wheels to choose from if/when the wind picked up to over 9kph.
    I would also consider that if there was much wind he would have moved closer to the barriers and people thus decreasing teh “effective” wind speed to his wheels.

  • jules

    i guess it’s also the amount of rim material that is available to dissipate the heat. as rim design and composite materials technology progress, designers seem to be getting away with less material (lighter rims). this can only mean more heat per unit mass of rim material and a higher risk of it exceeding the glass transition temp (the point at which the resin’s structural properties change, for the worse).

  • Anonymous

    I can’t help but feel a dark cool grey or even gloss black decal would be hot. I like black/white, but I agree with you. Still, taste is such a subjective thing.

  • Tim

    CT is well placed to get hold of stuff to test, and moreover, is well qualified (certainly more qualified than I).

    Just because no one else does it, or it’s hard, doesn’t mean it ought not be done. Seth Godin would gleefully highlight that this is exactly the reason something that intensive should be done!

    A comparison of that nature would = eyeballs = value to the site.

  • eatmorelard

    I’m looking for a set of Ardennes FR myself. Where can you get them in Australia? The HED Australia website is worse than useless, sadly…

  • http://www.cyclingTipsBlog.com cyclingTips

    Maybe we should have races up the 1 in 20 and decide which wheels are better that way  ;-) 

  • eatmorelard

    I’ve set my best time’s up the steep stuff (Baw Baw, Alton Rd, Back of Falls) on Zipp 303 clinchers. Though not heavy weights at 1620g, they aren’ pure climbers either. I find I gain more on the decent – awesome, confidence inspiring cornering with the right tyre combo – than the seconds I would (possibly) have lost on the climb.

  • JBS

    I was bad…wiggle.co.uk

    I’d been interested in them for ages and then spotted them for $1k less a 20% promo discount (so ~$800), it was too hard to say no too.

    I have seen them for sale in Melbourne at the Freedom Machine, but that was a while ago.

  • Jefftee

    Regardless of design or appearance what worries a bit these days is the construction of the wheels. I’m thinking of the recent Tour of Britain and the coming together of Ian Bibby and Geraint Thomas. The thought was that Thomas’s foot/pedal went into Bibby’s front wheel. The wheel just collapsed and I’m sure this contributed to the heaviness of his fall. I’m also reminded of the coming together of Haussler and Cavendish in the Tour of Switzerland last year. Haussler’s wheel seemed to collapse in the same way. Would these sorts of things happen if conventional “old” spoked wheels were used?

  • Jefftee

    Regardless of design or appearance what worries a bit these days is the construction of the wheels. I’m thinking of the recent Tour of Britain and the coming together of Ian Bibby and Geraint Thomas. The thought was that Thomas’s foot/pedal went into Bibby’s front wheel. The wheel just collapsed and I’m sure this contributed to the heaviness of his fall. I’m also reminded of the coming together of Haussler and Cavendish in the Tour of Switzerland last year. Haussler’s wheel seemed to collapse in the same way. Would these sorts of things happen if conventional “old” spoked wheels were used?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=636550395 Robert Merkel

    Well, yes, that’s kinda the idea.  But it needs to be done in a systematic way to filter out all the other things that might affect the results.  If you beat me by 5 minutes up the 1 in 20 when you’re on climbing wheels and I’m using 404s, that doesn’t prove a lot about the merits of the wheels :-)

    Seriously, quantitative experimental design and interpretation is what scientists do every day.  If you want this kind of comparison done right, get a scientist to help.

  • Mat

    The angles would also be dependent upon total weight. TM isn’t a lightweight.

  • Echidna_sg

    I own two sets of 2010 HED wheels – JET 6FR and Jet 9FR fronts as well as Jet 9FR and Jet disc FR rear. These are normal spoked, scandium/aluminium wheels that just happen to have a carbon cap on them to make them more aero.  The Ardennes are the same C2 rim (23mm wide) as used in the Jet range, with the top spec models using scandium instead of aluminium for the rim material.  What’s all that mean?

    They are as strong as a “standard wheel” quite simply because they are a standard spoked wheel… best bit about this type of wheel – you can re-true them including the disc unlike any other brand of disc that I know of.

    lower pressures? I think this relates to lower pressures compared to tubs… all I know is they are fast, the braking reliable and the cornering feel is fantastic due to the wide but short contact patch on the road…. might need to change my tyres now – have been TT’ing on veloflex records…. ;-)

  • Steve

    Agreed.

  • Abdu

    That was a bad one Jefftee, the slo mo is at 1 min 10:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK2K5EbzmRc

    Doesn’t look like the pedal, but rather the other rim hits it causing the failure.

    PS. Great call about cruising along sounding like you’re in the Milennium Falcon CT, but I heard you took it a bit far making these noises in the bunch this morning:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pr3sBks5o_8&feature=related

  • Big Dragon

    These wheels look to be well priced for what you get, but i still wonder about where the tipping point is with the build technology today in value for money. As far as I can see, manufacturers are keen to push the envelope a bit further each time, and good on them, but will we, or have we reached an optimum point at some stage. I love the advances and the discussion it brings, but I would reckon the most important factor to a degree, is feel on the road, and how it makes you feel when you ride whatever wheels you have. As long as you are not riding a set from the ark, at the level most of us race at, the difference between 2k and 4k for a set of wheels would most likely give us not much. I have not yet heard any of the blokes I race with complain about losing due to their low budget wheels……yet. Maybe thats one I can add to the excuse book.

    Another great post thanks Wader…let me know if you need a re-test of these wheels. I reckon I am only 20th in line.

  • Big Dragon

    These wheels look to be well priced for what you get, but i still wonder about where the tipping point is with the build technology today in value for money. As far as I can see, manufacturers are keen to push the envelope a bit further each time, and good on them, but will we, or have we reached an optimum point at some stage. I love the advances and the discussion it brings, but I would reckon the most important factor to a degree, is feel on the road, and how it makes you feel when you ride whatever wheels you have. As long as you are not riding a set from the ark, at the level most of us race at, the difference between 2k and 4k for a set of wheels would most likely give us not much. I have not yet heard any of the blokes I race with complain about losing due to their low budget wheels……yet. Maybe thats one I can add to the excuse book.

    Another great post thanks Wader…let me know if you need a re-test of these wheels. I reckon I am only 20th in line.

  • Notso Swift

    I find it amusing that everyone is trying to make their Clinchers more like Tubulars…
    Maybe tubulars are the answer in the first place

    Also seems to me that everyone seems to be selective when “X” attribute is better.
    Lower pressure make it “feel” more like a tubular and can roll faster, it may be true – Except the wider rim makes it “acually” have a greater Area for more air drag! When the Elite National track squads (who have more non-biased research available
    than any other source) run clinchers I will start to believe they have
    finally got the better of tubulars

    Tubulars are run at mega pressures, because they can, but the CX guys run them low, because the can!

  • Jefftee

    I was only going by a commentary I heard. Had a look at on TV at the time  but couldn’t see a pedal obviously involved. Probably makes it worse really. Another famous incident of wheel collapse is Sandy Casar hitting the dog in TDF.

  • Abdu

    They go with the hideous TT skinsuit, those things had better be performance enhancing because damn they’re ugly. The Aussie ones especially, with the funny waist thing…Durbridge is a monster but looks like the proverbial Girly Man in that skinsuit.

    Sorry to go all fashionistabitch here, maybe I should just have a beer and relax and have a boogie:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaaG66xGfDg&feature=player_embedded#at=15

  • Abdu

    They go with the hideous TT skinsuit, those things had better be performance enhancing because damn they’re ugly. The Aussie ones especially, with the funny waist thing…Durbridge is a monster but looks like the proverbial Girly Man in that skinsuit.

    Sorry to go all fashionistabitch here, maybe I should just have a beer and relax and have a boogie:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaaG66xGfDg&feature=player_embedded#at=15

  • diamondjim

    There’s some interesting stuff on rolling resistance (including more-or-less objective comparison charts, albeit a bit out of date) at http://www.rouesartisanales.com/article-1503651.html .  As I read it, clinchers have a lower coefficient of rolling resistance.
    Also – I’m not interested in a wheelset with a ‘breaking surface’, alloy, carbon or otherwise.  Maybe that’s what Jeftee et al are talking about above…

  • Sumbitor

    small diameter tyres have higher rolling resistance at the same tyre pressure because tire deformation is proportionally more important, in other words the tire is less round, wider tire roll better than narrow ones, this assertion generall generates skepticism, nervertheless at the same tire pressure a narrow tire deflects more and so deforms more

  • Sumbitor

    small diameter tyres have higher rolling resistance at the same tyre pressure because tire deformation is proportionally more important, in other words the tire is less round, wider tire roll better than narrow ones, this assertion generall generates skepticism, nervertheless at the same tire pressure a narrow tire deflects more and so deforms more

  • Tim

    That’s not what I was trying to get at. I was saying a Wade’s-eye view/comparison would be more than sufficient.

  • Tim

    That’s not what I was trying to get at. I was saying a Wade’s-eye view/comparison would be more than sufficient.

  • Jefftee

    You’re right. I’d rather lose a few spokes and stay upright than collapse in a heap on the road.

  • BC

    The wheel collapse was Burghardt.  Casar also hit a dog that tour, got back up and won the stage.

  • Big Dragon

    I’m with you there swifty regarding the track. Few outside environmental factors etc, so its a reasonably controlled predictable environment to test/race in, but on the road, I am not so sure. Ihave to admit I have always been a clincher fan, and along with all the elemental factors, wind, rain….training, maybe for the masses there is not much difference.

  • Brent Dawson

    Hi, not sure if you have the older distributors website mixed with ours (my company took over the distribution in May this year).. try http://www.hedcycling.com.au . I hope its not useless or worse…

    regardless if you cant find what your looking for please feel free to contact me and i can refer you to our dealers we are setting up across Australia. 

    [email protected]

    Regarding OS online- we’ve worked really hard to get our prices close to or inline with the big US and UK stores, hopefully you’ll be pleasantly surprised (along with getting local warranty and service)!

    thanks- Brent Dawson
    Dawson Sports/ HED Cycling Australia

  • Abdu

    Bingo, there’s your perfect response to a customer (and all of us potentials) right there. Nice one Brent.  
     
     

  • Abdu

    Bingo, there’s your perfect response to a customer (and all of us potentials) right there. Nice one Brent.  
     
     

  • Jimmy_macca

    Interesting point. I would guess that the lateral strength of a deep section carbon rim would be equal to that of a standard single wall alloy rim, especially given the larger rim cross section. Carbon is more prone to snapping above its yield strength, but you’ve probably already crashed to get to that amount of force on the rim, so there’s not much benefit either way.
    A lot of the ‘strength’ of a bicycle wheel actually comes from the spokes, not the rim. It has been the increasing axial strength of rims (by using material like carbon) that have allowed wheel manufacturers to use less and less spokes (18 front and 24 rear silver in this case) since the rim can take more and more of the load. The spoke tension is also higher. The problem comes when someone puts their pedal through your wheel and breaks a spoke or two. In wheels with 36 spokes laced 3 cross ‘old style’ if you break a spoke not much happens to the wheel, it just goes a bit out of true. When you break 1 of the 18 axially laced spokes things go pear shaped for the wheel very quickly (literally), this stresses and breaks more spokes causing the wheel to fail totally, or the rim hits the frame and jams, you lose control and crash.

  • JBS

    I agree with Abdu.

    I should clarify, price wasn’t the sole reason I bought my wheels from OS, I had been looking for a good 12+ months and a healthy degree of frustration with the previous distributor played a large part in my decision.  If local prices are in the same ballpark as OS online and the local dealers/distributor are reliable, I am more than happy to buy local.  Your comments here, Brent, suggest a big step in that direction which is great.

  • BlackGhost

    HaHa!!  Wade, looking at the state of your lawn, now I know how you manage to fit so much in your day!!  It’s a jungle out there!!

  • Anonymous

    I reckon something like this would be a good baseline:

    - Wade, or someone else as test rider
    - bike equipped with a power meter
    - plot a course somewhere that’s not likely to have cars interrupt (Boulie, say)
    - test rider goes out and tries to stick to pre-set wattage level over the course
    - take wind direction and speed , tyre pressures, temperature (maybe?) into account

    …and fastest time ‘wins’. It’s probably not ideal but it probably shakes out as many variables as you can without getting too scientific.

  • Anonymous

    I reckon something like this would be a good baseline:

    - Wade, or someone else as test rider
    - bike equipped with a power meter
    - plot a course somewhere that’s not likely to have cars interrupt (Boulie, say)
    - test rider goes out and tries to stick to pre-set wattage level over the course
    - take wind direction and speed , tyre pressures, temperature (maybe?) into account

    …and fastest time ‘wins’. It’s probably not ideal but it probably shakes out as many variables as you can without getting too scientific.

  • Anonymous

    The Highroad riders do seem to like HED (heh heh heh), I seem to recall that they never had a wheel sponsor so that it freed them up to ride whatever they liked to suit the conditions – so it’s a pretty good endoresement really!

  • Anonymous

    The Highroad riders do seem to like HED (heh heh heh), I seem to recall that they never had a wheel sponsor so that it freed them up to ride whatever they liked to suit the conditions – so it’s a pretty good endoresement really!

  • FlyingDutchman

    It’s not the design, it’s the material. It’s the typical carbon material reaction, it simply breaks when stressed beyond it’s limits. While an alloy rim would first shown some ductile behaviour before breaking and maybe the crash wouldn’t have been that bad.

    But that is one of the disadvantage you get with carbon, it doesn’t only bring you advantages.

  • Al

    Ooops… seems like everybody has forgotten something! Specifically, that there are lots of ways to *win* a race. E.g. sudden hard attacks vs. long powerful grinds. Depending on the rider’s style one or another wheelset may be advantageous. Greater rotational weight is definitely a drawback for a rider who makes sudden accelerations, but it can assist a rouleur to maintain momentum. So there is no “fastest” wheel that will uniformly win road races on all profiles for riders of all types. This, I believe, is simply a marketing dream.

    BUT in a TT/pursuit where the playing field for equipment is more level since the aim is to ride steadily and rapidly, the aerodynamics will help heaps… *and* rotational weight may even be of *benefit* if accelerations and decelerations (such as through sharp corners) do not play a major role. (Think how hard it is to slow the flywheel on your indoor spinning bike at the gym once it is up to speed).

    I have the Jet 6s and a pair of the HED 3 spokes for track racing. I agree with Wade, the 6s are a lovely general purpose wheels but personally I keep ‘em for racing :-) The HED3s require a certain style of track racing to be used to their fullest. They are quite heavy compared to a basic wheel, but they are so aero that once up to speed the bike gets a runaway feeling to it. I find they are really easy to *keep* at high speed, but they feel slightly harder to get there in a sudden jump than lighter wheels… so I adapt my style of racing when I use them and pick the events for which they will be employed. More thoughts on this on my own blog! *plug* here:
    http://animaland-ecotone.blogspot.com/2010/03/hed-3-track-use-review.html

    ;-)

  • http://www.cyclingTipsBlog.com cyclingTips

    From what I understand, Wiggins uses HED wheels too. The front wheel he used in yesterday’s TT was a H3 with PRO decals on it. Not sure about the rear

  • Al

    Hi Wade. The HED3s also get worked around a lot with various badges on them. The HED guys will know better than me (Brent?) but even the Specialized 3 spokes from (I think approx.) the 90s look to be the same design. The form has been around for ages… they are super aero wheels. I feel slow when I stick on my training wheels (track I mean) which are a pair of 36 spokes on box rims and campy hubs from 1974 :-P

  • Hughesdale Hammer

    Yaw angle is not dependent on weight. It’s the relative motion of the rider to the air – and that’s all, weight does not come into it.

  • Hughesdale Hammer

    Yaw angle is not dependent on weight. It’s the relative motion of the rider to the air – and that’s all, weight does not come into it.

  • Notso Swift

     …but you run narrower tyres at higher pressures which gives both less deformation (or the same, which creates heat  therefor lost energy) and lower contact patch (key in friction), facts often ignored in the research in order to reduce “variables” as part of a point, but those variables ARE the point!
    Cornering benefits of wider tyres are never in doubt but so few people get anywhere near the maximum lateral force available in most circumstances anyway

  • Matthew DeMaere

    They are available in Sydney through Velosophy

  • Hans Richmond

    Officially they are sponsored by Shimano, but Highroad pays Steve Hed to be their aero advisor.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tim-Chadwick/604555001 Tim Chadwick

    Ive been riding the Stinger 4 and have nothing bad to say about them.
    Love the review though maybe ill grab the 6′s next though those 7′s are awfully tempting :P

  • Greg

    My fastest time up Baw Baw was with mavic aksiums, a pump, saddle bag and 2 mostly full drink bottles. Unfortunately in the race with 303′s and no tools/water i was 20 secs slower. Stupid fatigue and previous attacks.

  • Greg

    303 tubs that is (1150g)

  • Greg

    303 tubs that is (1150g)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000915607438 Matthew Erik Wikstrom

    A few french guys are working on this problem. They performed their last great wheel test in 2008 and their testing protocols, and the results, make for some interesting reading (http://www.rouesartisanales.com/article-15441821.html). They say they’re carrying out the next great wheel test now, and this time, they are only testing carbon wheels. No posts from them on this, and once you read about their last wheel test, you’ll appreciate how much time it takes to test each wheel. Best thing? This appears to be a thoroughly independent test, though it would be nice to have a second testing centre to confirm their findings. Be that as it may, if you want data to guide your future purchases, these guys should have some to offer in due course.

    As for me, I think Wade had me at Millenium Falcon…

  • xrider64

    Sorry, but the notion of any clincher riding like a tubular is flat out b..s …..in my time I’ve ridden  (admittedly older style) Heds, some 404 tubs and XLr tubs, as well as the usual neutron and other Campy wheels with the best clincher tyres you can get (veloflex, conti’s etc) You could stick me blindfolded on a set of anything with tubulars on and I could tell you the difference immediately (although the ensuing crash blindfolded might be a laugh ;) ….there are no wheels and tyres in a clincher that ride anything like as sweet as a tub.

  • xrider64

    Sorry, but the notion of any clincher riding like a tubular is flat out b..s …..in my time I’ve ridden  (admittedly older style) Heds, some 404 tubs and XLr tubs, as well as the usual neutron and other Campy wheels with the best clincher tyres you can get (veloflex, conti’s etc) You could stick me blindfolded on a set of anything with tubulars on and I could tell you the difference immediately (although the ensuing crash blindfolded might be a laugh ;) ….there are no wheels and tyres in a clincher that ride anything like as sweet as a tub.

  • eatmorelard

    Awesome, Brent, this is exactly the sort of service that keeps my buying local (where possible). I’ll be in touch soon!

  • Jsizzle

    A very good point. Ductility is going to control the type of failure. As a rule of thumb more carbon = more brittle. Do you prefer slightly bent wheel or “catastrophic” failure?

  • Brent Dawson

    Hi Al,

    Dupont originally invented the 3Spoke (HED H3), In 1998 Steve Hed acquired the license from Specialized and its since become an iconic part of the Hed company. 

    Your right the form has been around for ages, i’ve got a set from 1998 still in my track bike also- they have tweaked and improved a little since then.

    Yes Wiggins uses the H3 front under Pro (Shimano decals)

    Regards Brent 

  • Brent Dawson

    Hi Al,

    Dupont originally invented the 3Spoke (HED H3), In 1998 Steve Hed acquired the license from Specialized and its since become an iconic part of the Hed company. 

    Your right the form has been around for ages, i’ve got a set from 1998 still in my track bike also- they have tweaked and improved a little since then.

    Yes Wiggins uses the H3 front under Pro (Shimano decals)

    Regards Brent 

  • Anonymous

    Rainbow jersey trumps ugly wheels. :)

  • Stetson_univ

    I’be had rusty spokes and broken spokes (3 separate occasions). The most recent at IMFL. Poor customer service at HED Corporate.
    Selling the wheels and moving on.

  • Stetson_univ

    I’be had rusty spokes and broken spokes (3 separate occasions). The most recent at IMFL. Poor customer service at HED Corporate.
    Selling the wheels and moving on.

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